Living with PCOS

PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age, often complicated by chronic anovulatory infertility and hyperandrogenism with the clinical manifestations of oligomenorrhoea, hirsutism, and acne.  Many women with this condition are obese and have a higher prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance, type II diabetes and sleep apnoea than is observed in the general population. They exhibit an adverse cardiovascular risk profile, as suggested by a higher reported incidence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, visceral obesity, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. PCOS is frequently diagnosed by gynecologists and it is therefore important that there is a good understanding of the long-term implications of the diagnosis in order to offer a holistic approach to the disorder.

Counselling :

Women should be made aware of the long-term implications of their condition, including their cardiovascular risk, by their doctor, in a way that is tailored to their individual circumstances. Women should be made aware of the positive effect of lifestyle modification, including weight loss, for improving their symptoms. Especially those women who are overweight or obese.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Mammogram

  • What exactly is a mammogram?

A mammogram is like an X-ray of the breast. You will be made to stand in front of a machine with your breast placed on a plate-like surface. Another plate will press against the breast from above in and hold it in place for the X-ray. This step is repeated to get a side view of the breast. A mammogram helps the doctor get a closer view of the breast in order to understand any changes that may not have been felt during a breast examination.

  • Are mammograms painful?

Mammograms are not painful, although they do cause a certain amount of pain or discomfort when the breasts are compressed against the plate-like surface. However, if you experience any pain during the mammogram, make sure to report it to the radiologist. Do not ignore the pain if it feels like more than a pinch.

  • When should I get a mammogram screening?

Breast cancer is common in women over the age of 50. Hence, women over 50 years of age should get screened once in two years. Younger women must consult their doctors to check for the best time to start getting screened. However, self-breast assessment is advised in younger women in order to understand and report immediately in case of any abnormalities in the breast.

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The basics of breastfeeding

“A newborn baby has only three demands. They are; warmth in the arms of (his) mother, food from her breasts and security in the knowledge of her presence. Breastmilk satisfies all three.”

  • Grantly Dick-Read

The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends exclusive breastfeeding until a baby is at least 6 months of age as it is optimal for babies and mothers. Breastmilk is your baby’s first feed and the first means of immunizing your baby against infections and allergies. Breastmilk keeps your baby healthy by supplying them with all the essential nutrients in its required quantities. It has the perfect combination of proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fats.

The importance of breastfeeding and its benefits for the mother and child are commonly known and often spoken about. However, there are certainly other aspects of breastfeeding that mother’s or expectant mothers need to know about in order to be able to breastfeed their baby efficiently.

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Everything you wanted to know about Breast Cancer

On an average 1 in 8 women suffer from the risk of developing breast cancer in their lifetime. The World Health Organization states that breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide.[1] In the UAE alone, breast cancer is one the top 5 cancers, and the leading cause of deaths caused by cancer.

Breast cancer is most commonly found in women over 40 years of age. However, the condition may also be caused in younger girls/teens, although the incidence is rather low. Women at different ages suffer from the risk of developing the condition and are differentiated based on various risk factors.

For a long time, the topic of breast cancer has been considered taboo and women often shy away from talking about it. In order to create awareness about breast cancer and bust common myths surrounding the condition, listed below are a few frequently asked questions and commonly misunderstood facts about breast cancer.

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Myths About Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers among adult men in the UAE. In the larger conversation about male organs and glands, the prostate gland often gets overlooked. Part of the male reproductive system, located under the bladder in front of the rectum and surrounding the beginning of the urethra, the prostate is actually a small gland. As a key part of the male reproductive system, the prostate gland produces and secretes fluid into the semen. Despite its small size and limited function, however, the prostate gland too can become cancerous.

Cancer begins when cells in one part of the body grow uncontrollably and then start spreading to other areas. The spread of the cancerous cells may be slow or rapid depending on the type of cancer and the body’s response to it. Just like other forms of cancer, prostate cancer too begins when the cells in the prostate gland begin to grow uncontrollably. Although the prostate gland functions as part of the reproductive system in men, its close proximity to the bladder results in individuals with prostate cancer exhibiting many urinary symptoms such as burning sensation or pain during urination; difficulty urinating; loss of bladder control; blood in the urine (hematuria) etc. However, these are not definitive symptoms, hence, it is strongly advised for adult male’s post the age of 40 to get themselves screened regularly for prostate cancer.

Despite the wide prevalence of prostate cancer, the conversation about it is only limited within the medical community, which has led to the perpetuation of many myths and a serious lack of awareness about the condition in this region. Myths and misconceptions about such a serious medical condition can be harmful to those who might be at risk for prostate cancer but ignore their symptoms as signs of a less detrimental condition. Some common myths regarding prostate cancer include:

  • Prostate cancer only affects older men: Statistics show that the probability of getting prostate cancer is higher in older men, however, middle aged and men in their late 40’s are also at risk for prostate cancer. The risk factors for prostate cancer extends beyond age including race, family history, physical health, geography and lifestyle.
  • Lack of symptoms implies the absence of prostate cancer: Unlike other forms of cancer, prostate cancer can be completely asymptomatic, particularly in its early stages. In such cases, a diagnosis can only be made by a doctor during a checkup and follow-up tests.
  • Prostate cancer is a slow-growing cancer: This isn’t always the case. There are different types of prostate cancer often present in different parts of the prostate. There are those that advance slowly as well as those that advance rapidly and can be fatal in their outcome.
  • Since prostate cancer doesn’t run in my family, the odds are that I will not get it: Although the probability of developing prostate cancer is higher if it runs in the family, the fact remains that even those without a predisposed hereditary risk factor can develop prostate cancer.
  • The Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a cancer test: The PSA test only determines the amount of PSA/ protein present in the bloodstream and not cancer. If an abnormal level of PSA is found, then the doctor recommends further tests to determine if the cause is prostate cancer. PSA test is not a prostate cancer determining test, for instance sometimes a high number may not mean you have the disease and a low number may not mean you don’t.
  • Vasectomy can cause prostate cancer: After extensive research, it has been concluded that vasectomy does not increase a man’s chances of getting prostate cancer.
  • Prostate cancer treatment results in incontinence or impotence: Although chemotherapy might have some side effects such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence, these effects are subject to the patient’s age and physical health.
  • Prostate cancer is contagious: The chances of having prostate cancer increases in men who have a family history of the condition. But in no way, shape or form is prostate cancer contagious among men.

Despite the widespread prevalence of prostate cancer, early detection and treatment have led to a complete recovery for a majority of the patients. To put things into perspective, the 5-year, 10-year and 15-year survival rates are nearly 100%, 98% and 95% respectively. But it is important that men get regular screening involving either a Digital rectal exam (DRE) or the PSA test if they notice any unusual symptoms or urinary functions. It is also recommended that all men above the age of 40 get prostate cancer screening despite not showing any symptoms because it will help identify cancer early when the treatment is most effective. Prostate cancer is one of the few cancers that can be neutralised completely, once detected. All that is required is the right knowledge about the condition and the initiative to get yourself tested regularly.

Dr.Rahul Bhatt

Specialist Urologist

Aster Clinic, Bur Dubai (AJMC)

Dr.-Rahul-Bhatt

*Aster Clinics are currently running a 50% discount on prostate cancer screening in line with the aim of promoting awareness about the importance of regular screening especially for men over 40. For more information, visit – http://asterclinic.ae/prostate-cancer-screening/

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