All You Need To Know About Cervical Cancer

As per the World Health Organization, cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women.[1] With the incidence of the disease increasing worldwide, it has become crucial to understand the various aspects of the diseases and what one can do to beat the condition.

Cancer is a disease that begins when cells in any part of the body begin to grow uncontrollably. Cervical cancer is one that begins in the lining of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus which opens into the vagina. Cervical cancer is one of the preventive cancers if detected early. The condition develops very slowly which begins as a condition called dysplasia; the abnormal development/growth of a tissue.

The condition is caused due to infection of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). There are various kinds of HPV’s, however cervical cancer is caused due to infection caused specifically by types 16 and 18. Not all types of HPV viruses cause cervical cancer, some cause conditions like genital warts. Unlike many other cancers for which there is no designated cause, we know the exact causative factor of cervical cancer. Most adult women would have been affected by the HPV virus at some point in their life. In most cases, the infection goes away on its own without any treatment. However, in some cases the infection stays for prolonged periods, leading to cervical cancer. In addition to the HPV, unhealthy lifestyle practices like smoking also puts a woman at the risk of developing cervical cancer.

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Postpartum tips for new mothers

The postpartum period begins after the delivery of the child until the mother’s body returns to the pre-pregnancy state. This period is generally defined as the first 6 weeks after childbirth.  A baby is a whole new adjustment for the entire family and it may take some time to get used to the new family unit. This period may also involve you, as a mother, spending most time bonding with your baby and less time with your partner. However, the weeks after adjusting to motherhood can be challenging, particularly if you are a first-time mother. Although it is important to take care of your baby, it is also extremely important to take care of yourself and your body.

Since you would have gotten into a routine with your baby during the day and night, it may not be an easy start. However, here are a few tips that can help ease the process;

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Do You Know About Peri-Menopause?

Most women are aware of menopause, however, there is also a phase before menopause, called the peri-menopause which is a rather significant but lesser known phase.

This is not a disease and must not be considered one. Peri-menopause and menopause are few of the very few certain changes that every woman experiences, hence giving them a chance to prepare for it.  This transition phase lasts until a woman completely enters into menopause.

So what is peri-menopause? Perimenopause is a transitional stage in a woman’s reproductive age that begins roughly around 4-5 years before menopause. Peri-menopause is a gradual and normal process, the number of years may vary in different women, in some women, the stage may last only a few months and in others, it could continue for more than 5 years.

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Facts about Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) encompasses a vast array of psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, loss of confidence and mood swings. There are also physical symptoms, typically bloatedness and breast pain. It is the timing, rather than the types of symptoms, and the degree of impact on a woman’s daily activity that supports a diagnosis of PMS.

Four in ten women (40%) experience symptoms of PMS and of these 5% – 8% suffer from severe PMS. Although the cause remains uncertain, it is assumed that some women are ‘sensitive’ to progesterone and progestogens. The second theory implicates the neurotransmitters serotonin and c-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in causing PMS symptoms. Reducing salt, caffeine, and stress along with increasing exercise is typically all that is recommended in those with mild symptoms. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation may be useful in some. Anti-inflammatory drugs may help with physical symptoms.  In those with more severe symptoms, birth control pills may be useful.

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Living with PCOS

PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age, often complicated by chronic anovulatory infertility and hyperandrogenism with the clinical manifestations of oligomenorrhoea, hirsutism, and acne.  Many women with this condition are obese and have a higher prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance, type II diabetes and sleep apnoea than is observed in the general population. They exhibit an adverse cardiovascular risk profile, as suggested by a higher reported incidence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, visceral obesity, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. PCOS is frequently diagnosed by gynecologists and it is therefore important that there is a good understanding of the long-term implications of the diagnosis in order to offer a holistic approach to the disorder.

Counselling :

Women should be made aware of the long-term implications of their condition, including their cardiovascular risk, by their doctor, in a way that is tailored to their individual circumstances. Women should be made aware of the positive effect of lifestyle modification, including weight loss, for improving their symptoms. Especially those women who are overweight or obese.

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