The most common symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)

Indigestion or dyspepsia-is a general feeling of discomfort in your upper abdomen. It may be an unpleasant or even painful sensation in the top of the abdomen or lower part of the chest, which usually comes after eating or drinking. Indigestion is a symptom but not a disease as such.

Symptoms

People with indigestion may have one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Abdominal burn
  • Bloating/feeling of distension in the upper abdomen.
  • Nausea.
  • Early fullness while eating.
  • Feeling uncomfortable after eating

When to see a doctor

Consult your doctor if discomfort persists for more than two weeks. Contact your doctor right away if pain is severe or there is

  • Reduced appetite
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Recurrent vomiting or vomiting with blood
  • Black, tar-like stool
  • Difficulty in  swallowing
  • Fatigue or weakness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Vijay Anand

Specialist Gastroenterologist

Aster Clinic, Al Qusais (Damascus St.)

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At the Heart of Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that can lead to complications over time. These complications can include:

  • Coronary heart diseases  or Cardiovascular disease which can lead to a heart attack
  • Cerebrovascular diseases which can lead to a stroke
  • Retinoplasty (disease of the eye) which can lead to blindness
  • Nephropathy (disease of the kidney) which can lead to kidney failure and the need for dialysis
  • Neuropathy (disease of the nerves) which can lead to, among other things, ulceration of the foot requiring amputation.

Many of these complications produce no symptoms in the early stages, and most can be prevented or minimized with a combination of regular medical care and blood sugar monitoring.

Heart diseases, particularly coronary heart diseases (CHD) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus. At least 68% of people aged 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease and 16% of people die of stroke. Compared to individuals without diabetes, those with diabetes have a higher prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD), a greater extent of coronary ischemia, and are more likely to have a Heart Attack (MI) and silent heart attack.

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Facts about Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) encompasses a vast array of psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, loss of confidence and mood swings. There are also physical symptoms, typically bloatedness and breast pain. It is the timing, rather than the types of symptoms, and the degree of impact on a woman’s daily activity that supports a diagnosis of PMS.

Four in ten women (40%) experience symptoms of PMS and of these 5% – 8% suffer from severe PMS. Although the cause remains uncertain, it is assumed that some women are ‘sensitive’ to progesterone and progestogens. The second theory implicates the neurotransmitters serotonin and c-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in causing PMS symptoms. Reducing salt, caffeine, and stress along with increasing exercise is typically all that is recommended in those with mild symptoms. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation may be useful in some. Anti-inflammatory drugs may help with physical symptoms.  In those with more severe symptoms, birth control pills may be useful.

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Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that can lead to complications over time. These complications can include:

  • Coronary heart diseases, which can lead to a heart attack
  • Cerebrovascular diseases which can lead to a stroke
  • Retinoplasty (disease of the eye) which can lead to blindness
  • Nephropathy (disease of the kidney) which can lead to kidney failure and the need for dialysis
  • Neuropathy (disease of the nerves) which can lead to, among other things, ulceration of the foot requiring amputation.

Many of these complications produce no symptoms in the early stages, and most can be prevented or minimized with a combination of regular medical care and blood sugar monitoring. (more…)

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Defeating Diabetes

The International Diabetes Federation states that 415 million people globally have diabetes. As per research conducted by the International Diabetes Federation, 19.3% of the population in UAE are living with Diabetes. [1]

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood sugar caused by discrepancies in producing sufficient insulin. It is a serious chronic condition caused when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body is unable to effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas and is responsible for regulating and maintaining the blood sugar levels in the normal range. Insulin deficiency causes an imbalance in the blood sugar levels, raising it to higher than normal levels, resulting in Diabetes.

Every year, the 14th of November is recognized as World Diabetes Day, in order to spread the word about diabetes and its health consequences of being left untreated and ineffectively managed. World Diabetes Day 2017 goes to the theme Women and Diabetes – Our right to a healthy future.

Half of the people affected by diabetes globally are women. The burden of diabetes on women is unique because it can affect a woman and her unborn child. There are majorly 2 types of diabetes; Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the pancreas considering it to be a foreign body. The pancreas stop functioning and there is no insulin production, hence causing the buildup on sugar levels in the blood. Type 2 diabetes generally develops after the age of 35 and is caused when the body doesn’t develop sufficient insulin or becomes insulin resistant.  Women, however also suffer from a condition called as Gestational Diabetes.

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